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Build a PVC Dog Cart

We intended to build a PVC dog cart for Comet but somehow never found the time. Therefore, we are providing links and reviews of plans from two other folks regarding dog drafts carts of this type.


Angie Meroshnekoff's Plans

Photo of the cart Angie built for her Great Pyrennees.

Angie Meroshnekoff adapted Michael Marcus' plans to build a dog cart using PVC for around  USD 35 (not including wheel cost).

She utilized discarded wheelchair wheels, but suggests you can use 20-inch bicycle wheels if a smaller dog will pull the cart.

Her instructions and detailed photos are very clear.



Michael Marcus Dog Cart Plans

The drawings and full plans can be found here. A link to them can also be found on the Columbia River Newfoundland Club website.

Michael discovered that building the platform was easy, but that the wheels and axle were the most challenging  part.

He also mentions you may have to adapt the height of the shafts according to:

  • The size wheel you use (he used 24-inch wheelchair wheels)
  • The type of harness your dog wears


MORE ABOUT THE WHEELS

To keep costs down, try to scrounge wheels off old bicycles or wheelchairs. Keep in mind the following:

  • Wheels are sized according to the outside diameter of the tire
  • Common bicycle sizes in the U.S. are 20, 24, 26 and 27 inches; wheelchair wheels are usually 24 inches*

*For metric sizes and other bicycle tire info, click here (scroll down to the"Fractional Sizing" chart)

  • Make sure your wheels match, i.e. don't use a front and a rear, or two different size wheels!
  • Use front wheels where possible since rear ones contain unneeded gears which may catch on things and are heavier
  • Be sure the wheels move freely on their axles, without much wobble
  • If they do wobble, check for broken or loose spokes. Use a spoke tool to tighten them or ask a bike mechanic to make adjustments.
  • Check to see if the wheels still have all their bearings.
  • Make sure you have nuts to fasten them onto the cart axles.
  • Knobby tires and thicker tubes are more resistant to punctures. (You can also get thick, thornproof inner tubes or add some type of liquid sealant to regular inner tubes to prevent punctures.)
  • Quick release wheels will make it easy to disassemble the cart for stowing or transportation




Return from Build A PVC Dog Cart to Dog Carting for information on training your dog to pull a cart.